Monthly Archives: October 2013

Interview with Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, Dr.W.Baldwin Spencer 2013

Winston Baldwin Spencer is the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda. He has been Prime Minister since March 24, 2004, when his party, the United Progressive Party (UPP), which he had led as the opposition party for several years, won a parliamentary election. He has also been Minister of Foreign Affairs since January 6, 2005.

In 2004, Baldwin Spencer led the United Progressive Party to a landslide victory in the general election. He defeated Lester Bird’s ALP, which had ruled Antigua and Barbuda for the previous 28 years. In Government he moved to enact a trio of good government reforms: a nationwide school meals program, raising the minimum wage and paying all civil servants.

Internationally Baldwin Spencer is known as a skilled diplomat who helped his country assume the leadership of the Group of 77 in 2008. He received the highest order of Cote d’Ivoire, the Commander of the National Order. He was also recognized by the United Nations for his leadership, receiving the Millennium Development Goals Achievement Award in recognition for his work advancing the cause of international development.

Erin Brady, Miss USA 2013

Miss Connecticut USA Erin Brady stopped using her calculator and started wearing a crown when she captured the title of Miss USA 2013 on June 16th in Las Vegas, Nevada. A former number cruncher and Financial Accountant for Prudential Retirement, the 25-year-old from East Hampton graduated from Central Connecticut State University with a degree in Finance and a minor in Criminal Justice. She is proud to be the first person in her family to obtain a college degree.

Erin was raised in a household where she was subjected to alcohol and substance abuse and as a result hopes to use her title to advocate for children that have been exposed to similar situations. It is her goal to break the cycle of addiction after learning that more than half of adult addicts were children of alcoholics. The environment that Erin grew up in allowed her to realize the importance of being a role model to her two younger sisters. Erin made the conscious decision to live on her own at the age of 17 and says the experience taught her how to be self-sufficient and emotionally strong.

In her free time, Erin enjoys relaxing with friends and family, skiing, cooking and exploring new restaurants. Erin has a passion for running and enjoys pushing her body to its physical limits. The last race she participated in was the ‘Tough Mudder,’ a rigorous obstacle course that tests your endurance and mental strength.

As Miss USA, Erin will be a spokesperson for breast and ovarian cancer education, prevention and awareness and will work closely with organizations such as Gilda’s Club, Susan G. Komen and the National Ovarian Cancer Alliance, among others. After her reign, Erin plans to pursue her MBA however; she is excited to see where her new title takes her and has an interest in broadcasting and hosting.

Nelson Mandela: The Story with live performance by Yvonne Chaka Chaka, Princess of Africa – 2013

In 1989, while in the last months of his imprisonment, he obtained an LLB through the University of South Africa. He graduated in absentia at a ceremony in Cape Town.

Nelson Mandela, while increasingly politically involved from 1942, only joined the African National Congress in 1944 when he helped formed the ANC Youth League.

In 1944 he married Walter Sisulu’s cousin Evelyn Mase, a nurse. They had two sons Madiba Thembekile ‘Thembi’ and Makgatho and two daughters both called Makaziwe, the first of whom died in infancy. They effectively separated in 1955 and divorced in 1958.

Nelson Mandela rose through the ranks of the ANCYL and through its work the ANC adopted in 1949 a more radical mass-based policy, the Programme of Action.

In 1952, he was chosen at the National Volunteer-in-Chief of the Defiance Campaign with Maulvi Cachalia as his Deputy. This campaign of civil disobedience against six unjust laws was a joint programme between the ANC and the South African Indian Congress. He and 19 others were charged under the Suppression of Communism Act for their part in the campaign and sentenced to nine months hard labour suspended for two years.

A two-year diploma in law on top of his BA allowed Nelson Mandela to practice law and in August 1952 he and Oliver Tambo established South Africa’s first black law firm, Mandela and Tambo.

At the end of 1952 he was banned for the first time. As a restricted person he was only able to secretly watch as the Freedom Charter was adopted at Kliptown on June 26, 1955.

Nelson Mandela was arrested in a countrywide police swoop of 156 activists on December 5, 1955, which led to the 1956 Treason Trial. Men and women of all races found themselves in the dock in the marathon trial that only ended when the last 28 accused, including Mr. Mandela were acquitted on March 29, 1961.

On March 21, 1960 police killed 69 unarmed people in a protest at Sharpeville against the pass laws. This led to the country’s first state of emergency on March 31 and the banning of the ANC and the Pan Africanist Congress on 8 April. Nelson Mandela and his colleagues in the Treason Trial were among the thousands detained during the state of emergency.

During the trial on June 14, 1958 Nelson Mandela married a social worker Winnie Madikizela. They had two daughters Zenani and Zindziswa. The couple divorced in 1996.

Days before the end of the Treason Trial Nelson Mandela travelled to Pietermaritzburg to speak at the All-in Africa Conference, which resolved he should write to Prime Minister Verwoerd requesting a non-racial national convention, and to warn that should he not agree there would be a national strike against South Africa becoming a republic. As soon as he and his colleagues were acquitted in the Treason Trial Nelson Mandela went underground and began planning a national strike for March 29, 30 and 31. In the face of a massive mobilization of state security the strike was called off early. In June 1961 he was asked to lead the armed struggle and helped to establish Umkhonto weSizwe (Spear of the Nation).

On January 11, 1962 using the adopted name David Motsamayi, Nelson Mandela left South Africa secretly. He travelled around Africa and visited England to gain support for the armed struggle. He received military training in Morocco and Ethiopia and returned to South Africa in July 1962. He was arrested in a police roadblock outside Howick on August 5, while returning from KwaZulu-Natal where he briefed ANC President Chief Albert Luthuli about his trip.

He was charged with leaving the country illegally and inciting workers to strike. He was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment which he began serving in Pretoria Local Prison. On May 27, 1963 he was transferred to Robben Island and returned to Pretoria on June 12. Within a month police raided a secret hide-out in Rivonia used by ANC and Communist Party activists and several of his comrades were arrested.

In October 1963 Nelson Mandela joined nine others on trial for sabotage in what became known as the Rivonia Trial. Facing the death penalty, his words to the court at the end of his famous ‘Speech from the Dock’ on April 20, 1964 became immortalized:

“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

On June 11, 1964 Nelson Mandela and seven other accused Walter Sisulu, Ahmed Kathrada, Govan Mbeki, Raymond Mhlaba, Denis Goldberg, Elias Motsoaledi and Andrew Mlangeni were convicted and the next day were sentenced to life imprisonment. Denis Goldberg was sent to Pretoria Prison because he was white while the others went to Robben Island.

Nelson Mandela’s mother died in 1968 and his eldest son Thembi in 1969. He was not allowed to attend their funerals.

On March 31, 1982 Nelson Mandela was transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town with Sisulu, Mhlaba and Mlangeni. Kathrada joined them in October. When he returned to the prison in November 1985 after prostate surgery Nelson Mandela was held alone. Justice Minister Kobie Coetsee had visited him in hospital. Later Nelson Mandela initiated talks about an ultimate meeting between the apartheid government and the ANC.

In 1988 he was treated for Tuberculosis and was transferred on December 7, 1988 to a house at Victor Verster Prison near Paarl. He was released from its gates on Sunday, February 11, 1990, nine days after the unbanning of the ANC and the PAC and nearly four months after the release of the remaining Rivonia comrades. Throughout his imprisonment, he had rejected at least three conditional offers of release.

Nelson Mandela immersed himself into official talks to end white minority rule and in 1991 was elected ANC President to replace his ailing friend Oliver Tambo. In 1993 he and President FW de Klerk jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize and on April 27, 1994 he voted for the first time in his life.

On May 10, 1994 he was inaugurated South Africa’s first democratically elected President. On his 80th birthday in 1998 he married Graça Machel, his third wife.

True to his promise Nelson Mandela stepped down in 1999 after one term as President. He continued to work with the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund he set up in 1995 and established the Nelson Mandela Foundation and The Mandela-Rhodes Foundation.

In April 2007 his grandson Mandla Mandela became head of the Mvezo Traditional Council at a ceremony at the Mvezo Great Place.

Nelson Mandela never wavered in his devotion to democracy, equality and learning. Despite terrible provocation, he never answered racism with racism. His life has been an inspiration to all who are oppressed and deprived, to all who are opposed to oppression and deprivation.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka aka Princess of Africa did a live performance, where Nelson Mandela was honored with the South South Awards 2013. In New York, his two daughters Zindzi Mandela and Josina Machel picked up the award on his behalf.

2013 South-South Awards Honor Global Governance Leaders

The 2013 South-South Awards ceremony was held on Sunday, September 22 at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City. The awards recognize governments and private and public sector leaders who have made significant contributions to sustainable development. This year’s Global Governance Leadership award recipients included:
Her Excellency Laura
Chinchilla Miranda, President of Costa Rica
His Royal Highness Khalifa bin Salman Al- Khalifa, Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Bahrain
His Excellency Josaia Voreqe
Bainimarama, Prime Minister of Fiji
The Global Governance Leadership Awards are presented to individuals who have made distinctive contributions to sustainable development, the youth, e-governance, and information and communications technology. Other award recipients this year included:
His Excellency Nelson
Mandela, Madame Graça Machel
Mr. David Paich.
The ceremony was hosted by Erin Brady, Miss USA 2013 and entertainment provided by world music icons Les Nubians, Yvonne Chaka Chaka, and Robin DiMaggio and the Posse 2.0, the Arsenio Hall House Band. Noami Campbell, supermodel, was on hand to support the cause.

Exclusive interview with Christopher Weaver, Founder Bethesda Software – 2013

Bethesda Softworks, LLC, is an American video game publisher. A subsidiary of ZeniMax Media, the company was originally based in Bethesda, Maryland, and eventually moved to their current location in Rockville, Maryland. Consisting of a broad portfolio of games in role-playing, racing, simulation, and sports, Bethesda Softworks’ major franchises are distributed worldwide.

Bethesda Softworks has been a developer and publisher of interactive entertainment content for over two decades. Though since 2001 Bethesda Softworks is only a publisher and Bethesda Game Studios is the developer. Founded in 1986 by Christopher Weaver in Bethesda, Maryland, and moved to Rockville, Maryland, in 1990, the company has a long history of PC and console games. In 1999, Christopher Weaver and Robert Altman founded ZeniMax Media, Inc.

Bethesda is credited with the creation of the first physics-based sports simulation (Gridiron!) in 1986 for the Atari ST, Commodore Amiga and Commodore 64/128. Early games scored respectably in the gaming press.

The company is best known for creating The Elder Scrolls RPG series, based upon the original programming of Julian Lefay. The first chapter of the series, entitled The Elder Scrolls: Arena, was released in 1994. Since that time, numerous other chapters have been released. The game’s direct sequels, Daggerfall, Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim were released in 1996, 2002, 2006 and 2011, respectively. Additionally, the game has had three spin-offs: Battlespire (1997), Redguard (1998), and The Elder Scrolls Travels series.

Bethesda Softworks is also known for publishing titles based upon popular movie franchises, including The Terminator, Star Trek and Pirates of the Caribbean.

In 2004, the Fallout franchise was acquired by Bethesda Softworks from Interplay Productions and the development of Fallout 3 was handed over to Bethesda Game Studios. Fallout 3 was released on October 28, 2008. Five downloadable content packs for Fallout 3 were released in the year following its release—Operation: Anchorage, The Pitt, Broken Steel, Point Lookout and Mothership Zeta. Obsidian Entertainment’s new Fallout title, Fallout: New Vegas was published in 2010.

Bethesda Softworks continues to expand their publishing into new franchises, releasing Wet and Rogue Warrior in 2010, and Splash Damage’s Brink and inXile Entertainment’s Hunted: The Demon’s Forge’ in 2011.

On June 24, 2009, Bethesda’s parent company, ZeniMax Media, acquired id Software, whose titles, including Rage, would be published by Bethesda Softworks – it was later announced that any games using the new id Tech 5 game engine will be published by them.

Our Charles Spinella, Gaming Guru for World Liberty TV, had the pleasure of interviewing the Pioneer of the Gaming Industry, Mr. Christopher Weaver, at the DMW NY Games Conference.

Interview with Greg Costikyan, Game Designer and Author, 2013

I’ve been in the game industry for more than 30 years — my first job, at 14, was assembling and shipping games in the warehouse at SPI. I’ve designed more than 30 commercially published board, roleplaying, computer, online, mobile and social network games; my ludography is here.

I have, in fact, been something of a pioneer in new and emerging game markets — I designed the first online game to attract more than a million players (MadMaze, for the old Prodigy COLS), founded one of the first mobile game publishers in North America, and today run a website devoted to promoting independently developed games — Play This Thing!, which reviews one independently created game each day.

In 2007, I received the Maverick Award at GDC for “tireless promotion of indie games;” I’ve also won five Origins Awards, and am an inductee into the Adventure Gaming Hall of Fame. I’ve written scads of articles on games; as well as four novels and a bunch of short stories. My piece “I Have No Words & I Must Design” is widely used in game studies programs across the globe, and I’ve lectured at universities in both Europe and North America; I also speak frequently at industry conferences.

I have also consulted to a wide variety of companies on game design and game industry business issues.

Free Games
The following have been released under a creative commons license:

• Vector 3, a space combat board game in 3D with vector mechanics, originally published in 1979.
• Violence: The Role-playing Game of Egregious and Repulsive Bloodshed, originally published by Hogshead Publishers Ltd., but now released under a Creative Commons license.
• Dot Boom, a satirical card game of the dot com era.
• Peg Solo, a Blitz Basic implementation of classic peg solitaire.

Academy Award Winning Actor Danny Aiello Jr. Interview – 2013

“Danny” Aiello Jr. is an American actor who has appeared in numerous motion pictures, including Once Upon a Time in America, Ruby, The Godfather: Part II, Hudson Hawk, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Moonstruck, Léon: The Professional, Two Days in the Valley, and Dinner Rush. He had a pivotal role in the 1989 Spike Lee film Do the Right Thing as Salvatore “Sal” Frangione, the pizzeria owner, which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Aiello is also known for his role as Don Domenico Clericuzio in the miniseries, Mario Puzo’s The Last Don.

Aiello broke into films in the early 1970s. One of his earliest roles came as a ballplayer in the 1973 baseball drama, Bang the Drum Slowly, with Robert De Niro. Aiello had a walk-on role as small-time hood Tony Rosato in The Godfather Part II (1974), ad-libbing the famous line “Michael Corleone says hello!” during a hit on a rival gangster Frank Pentangeli (Michael V. Gazzo).

In 1980, Aiello had a co-lead role with Jan Michael Vincent in Defiance, about some Manhattan residents who fight back against the thugs terrorizing the neighborhood. The next year, he received considerable acclaim for playing a racist New York City cop in Fort Apache, The Bronx (1981) with Paul Newman.

In 1981, Danny Aiello won a Daytime Emmy award for his appearance in an ABC Afterschool Special called A Family of Strangers.

Aiello’s singing has been on display in films such as Hudson Hawk (1991), Once Around (1991), and Remedy that starred his son Ricky Aiello and Jonathan Doscher. He has released several albums featuring a big-band sound including I Just Wanted To Hear The Words (2004) and Live From Atlantic City (2008). Aiello and EMI songwriter Hasan Johnson released an album in 2011 of standards fused with rap entitled Bridges.

He played the title character for the video of Madonna’s song, “Papa Don’t Preach” (1986).

Aiello’s Broadway theatre credits include Gemini, The Floating Light Bulb, Hurlyburly, and The House of Blue Leaves. He also was in the 1976 Broadway play Wheelbarrow Closers, directed by Paul Sorvino.

In July, 2011, opened Off Broadway in the two-act drama The Shoemaker, written by Susan Charlotte and directed by Antony Marsellis. The play is a stage version of his 2006 movie A Broken Sole, which began life in 2001 as a one-act play.

Tony Perez: One of the Greatest Boxing Referees of All Time – 2013

Tony Perez is considered one of the great referees. His career began in 1968. That bout was at Madison Square Garden that had Buster Mathis TKO James Woody in the 6th Round. He was the third man in the ring for Frazier VS Ellis, Ali vs Frazier, Ali vs Wepner, Ali vs Quarry, Mancini vs Arguello and so many more bouts. Tony was honored with the acclaimed Jose Torres Renaissance Man Award for 2013.

World Liberty TV team was on hand to interview Mr. Perez at the 3rd Annual Ring 10 Gala.

Marlon “Magic Man” Starling 2 time World Welterweight Boxing Champion, 2013

Marlon “Magic Man” Starling was a two-time US world champion boxer.

Starling was born in Hartford, CT in 1959. He turned professional in 1979. After 25 straight wins, he lost his first fight. He lost a 12 round decision to Donald Curry in 1982. Starling had a rematch with Curry in 1984, challenging for the WBA and IBF welterweight titles. Starling lost by a 15 round decision.

Starling’s second world title fight came in 1987. He knocked out Mark Breland in the 11th round to win the WBA welterweight title. In his third title defense, Starling lost the title in controversial fashion to Tomas Molinares. Molinares hit Starling with a punch that was clearly thrown after the bell. Starling went down for the only time in his career, and the referee counted him out. Molinares was declared the new champion by knock out. However, the decision was later changed to a no contest but the Colombian kept the title.

In 1989, Starling knocked out Lloyd Honeyghan to win the WBC welterweight titles. The following year, Starling challenged Michael Nunn for the IBF middleweight title, but lost by decision. In his next fight, Starling lost his welterweight titles on a close decision to Maurice Blocker. That was Starling’s last fight. He retired with a record of 45-6-1-1 (27 KOs).

Exclusive interview with Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini former World Lightweight Boxing Champion – 2013

Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini is a retired American boxer. He held the World Boxing Association lightweight championship from 1982 to 1984. Mancini inherited his distinctive nickname from his father, veteran boxer Lenny “Boom Boom” Mancini, who laid the foundation for his son’s career.

On May 8, 1982, in a match held in Las Vegas, he challenged the new World Boxing Association lightweight champion, Arturo Frias. Fifteen seconds into the fight, Frias caught Mancini with a left hook to the chin. Another combination made Mancini start bleeding from his eyebrow. Mancini recovered and dropped Frias right in the center of the ring with a combination. Dazed, Frias got back up but Mancini went on the offensive and was on top of Frias the moment the referee said they could go on. Mancini trapped Frias against the ropes. After many unanswered blows, the referee stopped the fight at 2:54 in the first round, and the Mancini family finally had a world champion.

Mancini’s first defense, against former world champion Ernesto España, went smoothly with a Mancini knockout win in the 6th round.

His next defense would change both his life and the face of boxing: On November 13, 1982, a 21-year-old Mancini met 23-year-old South Korean challenger Duk Koo Kim. Kim had to go through the process of losing several pounds immediately before the fight to make the weight. The title bout, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, was televised live at 1pm PST on CBS Sports. It was, according to many observers, a fight filled with action, but Mancini had an easy time hitting Kim during the 14 rounds the fight lasted. Kim suffered brain injuries that led to his death four days later. The week after his death, the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine showed Mancini and Kim battling, under the title “Tragedy in the Ring”.

Mancini went to the funeral in South Korea, but he fell into a deep depression afterwards. He has said that the hardest moments came when people approached him and asked if he was the boxer who “killed” Duk Koo Kim. Mancini went through a period of reflection, as he blamed himself for Kim’s death. In addition, Kim’s mother committed suicide four months after the fight, and the bout’s referee, Richard Green, killed himself in July 1983.

As a result of this bout, the WBC took steps to shorten its title bouts to a maximum of 12 rounds. The WBA and WBO followed in 1988, and the IBF in 1989.

Mancini retired officially in 1985, but continued to fight unofficially until 1992, leaving a record of 29–5, with 23 knockouts. A made-for-television movie based on Mancini’s life aired in the 1980s. The former champion was able to keep 75 percent of his $12 million in purse money, which enabled him to pursue a broad range of interests in retirement.

Mancini appeared in and produced a handful of films, and became a fight analyst for the Fox reality series Celebrity Boxing. Mancini, who as of 2007 resides in Los Angeles, California, owns the El Campeon Cigar Company and operates two movie production companies. He also owns a wine-tasting shop in his native Youngstown, Ohio.

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